USS Shark Cannons-History in Cannon Beach Wednesday

Can you find the Shark on this small section of our chart representing the Columbia River Bar area and some of the shipwrecks there?

Can you find the Shark on this small section of our chart representing the Columbia River Bar area and some of the shipwrecks there?

On Wednesday, August 13, the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum will host a lecture by Greg Shine on the cannons discovered in Arch Cape in February 2008,/a>. Shine is the Chief Ranger and Historian at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and the Northwest Cultural Resources Institute. This free, public program will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the History Center.
The cannons are believed to be from the wreck of a Navy ship named the USS Shark, which was surveying the Columbia River Bar when it struck a shoal and ultimately sunk in 1846.
For more information about the program, please call the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum at 503-436-9301.
As always, you can call the office (503-338-6056), or drop by Astoria’s Sunday Market to pick up a souvenir of your visit, our
Dead Reckoning shipwreck chart, the newest and most complete listing of shipwrecks for this region, presented in a beautiful lithograph on high-quality paper, and the ultimate which is framed and has photographs of the wrecks and other historic memorabilia such as lighthouses.

Links:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart at NW Limited…History in Vogue
Hear the stories of the USS Shark
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: Arch Cape Cannons
Cannon Lecture on North Oregon Coast Beach Connection.net

Experience

 

 

the

 WOW!

(click on the “wow” for our gallery)

 

 

 

 

Dead Reckoning July

Even in July, the waters of the Pacific Graveyard can be lethal.
July 11, 2008. The sun shines warmly, winds are calm.
The river is smooth like a peaceful lake.

Columbia River Bar Pilot boat Columbia

Columbia River Bar Pilot boat Columbia

Large ships glide along the channel which is now amply marked for safe navigaton.
Tugboats traverse around them, and swift pilot boats designed to deliver a different captain for every portion of the journey maneuver for fuel refills, now staged to fulfill their job.
Pleasure fishing boats also ply the waters and flit back and forth at a whim.
Presiding over them all, the relatively new Megler bridge which was finished in 1966.

The Astoria-Megler bridge spans the Columbia River from Astoria, OR to Megler, WA

The Astoria-Megler bridge spans the Columbia River from Astoria, OR to Megler, WA

The United States Coast Guard is also nearby with boats and the occasional helicopter, carrying out practice maneuvers, or just keeping an eye on the unusually heavy traffic.

Beneath this idyllic scenery, the miscellaneous remains of more than 2000 ships, boats, and many of their passengers, crew and cargo have become part of the unseen, the ominous reminders of epic losses, or chance misfortune.

Some July entries from “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard:”

Curacao -7/12/1940- Steamer: A boiler explosion sends her to a river tomb”
Zampa -7/14/1904- Schooner: Dead Reckoning into the Pacific Graveyard”
Perhaps the most historic of them:
U.S.S. Peacock -7/18/1841- Sloop of War: “Clear that white water” orders young Lt. Hudson as a shifting channel sets the ship amiss and strikes the bottom hard. “Man the pumps,” Hudson barks as an ebb tide secures the wedged ship for a constant pounding! “Remove yourselves and all pertinent papers”. The Lieutenant fears the worst and within 24 hours the ship is gone and the sandy tomb is renamed Peacock Spit!”


Though these ships have passed into history, you will find recognition of them and hundreds more on NW Limited…History in VogueTM‘s shipwreck chart.

River and mouth of bar detail of Dead Reckoning

River and mouth of bar detail of Dead Reckoning

 

The Columbia River bar at sunset as a ship heads over a calm bar

The Columbia River bar at sunset as a ship heads over a calm bar

Links:
Purchase a Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart
History Link Online Encyclopedia of Washington History
Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon

Grand Opening-Columbia River Coffee Roaster’s Company Store

Exterior of Columbia River Coffee Roasters Company Store (doesnt show the cool weathervane, but the signs up!)

Exterior of Columbia River Coffee Roaster's Company Store (doesn't show the cool weathervane, but the sign's up!)

 Grand opening day at Columbia River Coffee Roaster’s Company Store (July 5) was great fun:
Live music, the ability to sample a multitude of delectable baked goods, ogle some fresh art and of course the aroma of freshly-roasting coffee beans is intoxicating.
The weather may have been drizzly out of doors,
 
but the overall mood inside the Columbia River
Coffee Roaster is always cheery and bright.  
Smells great!

Smells great!

    If not, then we know what true “liquid sunshine” really is! THUNDERMUCK!

Dead Reckoning Shipwreck Chart...thanks for letting us hang!

Dead Reckoning Shipwreck Chart...thanks for letting us hang!

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and Privateer Lynx pictures

American flag flies at the stern of the Coast Guard Cutter Eagle
Old Glory framed against a blue sky, rippling in a northwesterly breeze and flying proudly on the United States Coast Guard cutter Eagle as she is moored alongside the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon.
Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, tall ship visiting Astoria, Oregon

 

 

The barque Eagle as seen from the Columbia River Maritime Museum on 6 June, 2008.
(Click for larger version)
Lightship Columbia, moored alongside, looks small in comparison to the 295′ long ship.

 

View of the stern of the ship, showing the draft markings at the hull

The Eagle was commissioned originally for the German Navy as the Horst Wessel in 1936.
Taken by the US as a war prize after WWII, she was re-commissioned in 1946 for the USCG.
More information on the Eagle’s history at this link
Click the image for a larger version.

 The rigging and mast of the USCG Cutter Eagle

Name plaque on the barque EagleThree ship's wheels!

The fuzzy stuff is called “baggywrinkle” and it is
designed to decrease chafing of the sailsBaggywrinkle in the rigging of the Cutter EagleThe 1812 Privateer Lynx under sail on the Columbia River

The 1812 Privateer Lynx under full sail on the Columbia River.

The tall ship Eagle turning on anchor, preparing to leave Astoria, Oregon

 

 

The USCG Cutter Eagle pivoting on anchor, turning from her Eastward-pointing direction as she prepares to depart out the mouth of the Columbia River, and navigate the waters of the Pacific Graveyard, where the bones of many ships and fishing vessels repose.

The barque pointed west on the columbia River near Astoria, Oregon
Pointed west, the barque then rides the ebb tide to the Pacific Ocean.

The USCG Cutter Eagle, escorted by an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter

The Eagle departing Astoria, escorted by an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter.

(click image at left for a larger version)

 Links:

Pictures and video on the USCG Press Release Page
If you love maritime history, sailing and boats in general, or know someone who does, have a look at our shipwreck chart, available for purchase: Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.
 

The sinking of the charter boat Taki Tooo

June 14, 2003, approx. 7:12 a.m.:

The sinking of the charter boat The capsized Taki Tooo on the Tillamook Bar near Garibaldi, Oregon
Taki-Tooo on the Tillamook Bar is one of the worst tragedies occurring on the Oregon coast
Eleven lives were lost,
the captain among those.

Eight survived.

Including the wreck of the Pearl C, the loss of just four vessels make up the majority of lives lost in the charter fishing industry on the Oregon and Washington coasts combined.

The Taki Tooo on the beach NTSB investigates
 

 

 

In an area rich with recreational fishing as well as a lengthy history of commercial fishing combined with the forces of nature unique to the region, it is no surprise to learn that there is also a matching roster of lost fishing vessels, with dates as old as the industry itself.
Even when we take heed of all the safety regulations, give consideration to the warnings, lives and boats are lost.
The elements will not be denied their due, it would seem.
A list of lost fishing vessels of the Oregon and Washington coast and Columbia River Bar from Bill Brooks' shipwreck chart Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
Detail of the lost fishing vessels list, printed using an antique letter press and using handmade paper.
Each name on the list, which is included on the framed version of “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” by NW Limited…History in VogueTM represents a story, fates intertwined, never to be forgotten, and always respected.

Links:
NTSB Press Release Update on the Sinking of the Taki-Tooo
Coast Guard Safety Alert
Northwest Sea Disasters: Beyond Acceptable Risk
9 Die in Oregon Boat Accident (CBS News)

Tall ships in Ilwaco, WA this weekend

The tall ships Privateer Lynx and the HMS Bounty will be in Ilwaco, WA this weekend, and open for public tours. (more information in the links below on dates/times)
Grand arrival for both ships is 3 p.m. and there will be free dockside tours.   
The Lynx was launched in 2001, built as a replica of the Privateer Lynx, originally built in 1812 in Maryland. “She was among the first ships to defend American freedom by evading the British naval fleet then blockading American ports and serving in the important privateering efforts.”
(quote from the Privateer Lynx’s site, link below).

HMS Bounty tall sailing shipThe HMS Bounty starred in the Pirates of the Carribbean, and in 1962’s “Mutiny on the Bounty” starring Marlon Brando.

Weather can often change the schedules; visit the ship’s websites for more information.
Can’t get enough of tall ships and maritime history?
Hop across the bridge to Astoria, Oregon and visit the USCG Cutter Eagle (click for link), which is another tall ship available for tours and multiple photo opportunities.

“The Eagle is a three-masted sailing barque with 21,350 square feet of sail. It is home ported at the CG Academy, New London, Connecticut. It is the only active commissioned sailing vessel in the U.S. maritime services. Before her Coast Guard duties, she was originally commissioned in 1936 by the German Navy under the name “SNS Horst Wessel”
(more information below at the USCG Cutter Eagle website).
Shipwreck chart by NW Limited...History in Vogue available for purchase

 
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” (shown at left) gives detailed information on each historic shipwreck of the southwest Washington and Northwest Oregon coast as well as the lower Columbia River.

 
The charts are available to purchase at NW Limited…History in VogueTM.  Find us at Astoria’s Sunday Market or contact us at 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com

These events are rare opportunities to view ships similar to the ones that historically plied the waters of the Pacific Graveyard, in good weather and bad, for better or worse…sometimes meeting their doom, or “making the chart” as we say.

 
Links:
Privateer Lynx
HMS Bounty
USCG Cutter Eagle
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
Calendar of Events on the Oregon Coast at northwest magazines

US Coast Guard Cutter EAGLE to visit Astoria

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle tall ship under sail off the coast of Oregon
The Coast Guard Academy’s three masted training Barque, Coast Guard Cutter Eagle (WIX 327), sets sails off the coast of Oregon during the 1999 summer trip. The cutter, which is homeported in New London, Conn., holds the distinction of being the largest tall ship to fly the Stars and Stripes. USCG photo by BORTHWICK, BRUCE YN1

ASTORIA, Ore. – The Coast Guard Cutter Eagle will be in Astoria and open for public tours from June 12 until June 16. This is Eagle’s first visit to Astoria since 1999, and a unique opportunity to climb aboard an extremely unique Tall Ship. Public tours are tentatively scheduled as follows:
.
Thursday June 12: 2 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
.
Friday June 13: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
.
Saturday June 14: 10 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.
.
Sunday June 15: 10 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.
.
The USCGC Eagle (WIX-327) is a 295′ barque used as a training cutter for future officers of the United States Coast Guard. She is the only active commissioned sailing vessel in American government service. She is the seventh U.S. Navy or Coast Guard ship to bear the name in a line dating back to 1792.
.
Each summer, Eagle conducts cruises with cadets from the United States Coast Guard Academy and candidates from the Officer Candidate School for periods ranging from a week to two months. These cruises fulfill multiple roles; the primary mission is training the cadets and officer candidates, but the ship also performs a public relations role. Often, Eagle makes calls at foreign ports as a goodwill ambassador.
###

“U.S. Coast Guard, when things are at their worst, we’re at our best. ”
Link to NW Limited’s Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard

History is happenin’

Visiting Clatsop County (Seaside, Astoria, Warrenton) this weekend?  Vacationing on the Long Beach Peninsula?
Maybe you live here and want to find something interesting to experience, or immortalize your memories for posterity.
These events will interest you:

The Oregon Encyclopedia Project is seeking Astoria residents to contribute ideas to their online Encyclopedia from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Astoria’s Public Library.
The 50th Anniversary of Ft. Clatsop is being celebrated at the Lewis & Clark National Historic Park.
Columbia River Maritime Museum has a “Steamboats of the Columbia” exhibit that will intrigue all ages.
Hands-on History Tours of Battery Russell at Ft. Stevens.
There’s also Victorian Vogue at Astoria’s Heritage Museum.
History in VogueTM is at Astoria’s Sunday Market for a piece of history you can take home with you.
Links:
History in Vogue
Ft. Stevens Information
Astoria’s Heritage Museum
Coast Weekend
Oregon Encyclopedia asks “What is Oregon?”

History comes alive

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission will welcome the public to a living-history event to celebrate the North Head Light House 110th anniversary at Cape Disappointment State Park near Ilwaco from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 17 and 18.
Historians will portray people who figured prominently in the lighthouse’s early years.
North Head light began operation May 16, 1898.
Its construction was necessitated by the high number of shipwrecks still occurring in the area, despite the existence of other lights marking the entrance to the Columbia River Bar:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
Enlargement of the Columbia River Bar area from NW Limited’s Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, depicting just the shipwrecks at the river’s mouth
The mouth of the river was treacherous, with deadly currents and tricky channels as well as the weather, which was prone to change. It claimed its toll in human lives as well as lost cargo.
In contrast to the countless lives saved since its inception, North Head light itself has a dark secret: In 1923, the keeper’s wife leapt from the cliff, falling 130 feet to hear death.
The lighthouse fell into disrepair in the years following the keeper’s obsolescence (the light was automated in 1961).
Luckily, the United States Coast Guard came to the rescue in 1984, and restored it, allowing it to open to the public under the direction of Cape Disappointment State Park.
Don’t miss this bit of living history, even if you can’t attend the event this weekend.

To order your shipwreck chart, call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com
We promise to give you the whole thing, not just the tiny portion shown above.

Links:
NW Limited…History in VogueTM
Living history event highlights lighthouse (Daily Astorian)
North Head Lighthouse