Fishing boats at dry dock – work wanted

The F/V Ballad at dry dock in Astoria in 2006

This crab boat also fishes in Alaska longlining for Halibut and Black Cod her hull is aluminum and she features twin propellers

Unwieldy-looking out of water, this old tuna boat waits for paint
Unwieldy-looking out of water, silhouetted against a Springtime sky, this old tuna boat waits hopefully for paint

Boats of all kinds:
In dry dock, stored for the Winter, for repair and restoration, or for good:

Another side of the tuna troller - fish out of water

Another side of the tuna troller - a fish out of water

Here, out of the water, surrounded by pavement, they appear as monuments to their trade, sentinels of countless storms of the Pacific Graveyard, and showing the effects of work and weather.

The Raven rests in dry dock a veteran survivor of the Pacific Graveyard?

The Raven rests in dry dock, a veteran survivor of the Pacific Graveyard?

Slated for demolition and disposal, this old hull sits waiting

Slated for demolition and disposal, this old hull waits. A sleek, newer version can be seen in the background.

Some of these may have been salvaged, the remnants of a disaster awaiting disposal.

The ones that didn’t make it won’t be found here…

Gillnetter, troller and charter sit side by side out of the water and in storage

Gillnetter, troller and charter sit side by side out of the water and in storage

…instead swallowed by the surf and consumed by the elements.

A sailboat hull sits up on blocks, the Astoria-Megler bridge is backdrop

A sailboat hull sits up on blocks, the Astoria-Megler bridge is backdrop

A fiberglass crabber's name says it all

This fiberglass crabbers name says it all

A diminutive gillnetter

A diminutive Columbia River gillnetter

The Raven, a wooden fishing vessel, sits approximating her water-borne stance on blocks, the car in the background gives a little perspective for size

The Raven, a wooden fishing vessel, sits approximating her water-borne stance, the car in the background gives a little perspective for size

The sinking of the charter boat Taki Tooo

June 14, 2003, approx. 7:12 a.m.:

The sinking of the charter boat The capsized Taki Tooo on the Tillamook Bar near Garibaldi, Oregon
Taki-Tooo on the Tillamook Bar is one of the worst tragedies occurring on the Oregon coast
Eleven lives were lost,
the captain among those.

Eight survived.

Including the wreck of the Pearl C, the loss of just four vessels make up the majority of lives lost in the charter fishing industry on the Oregon and Washington coasts combined.

The Taki Tooo on the beach NTSB investigates
 

 

 

In an area rich with recreational fishing as well as a lengthy history of commercial fishing combined with the forces of nature unique to the region, it is no surprise to learn that there is also a matching roster of lost fishing vessels, with dates as old as the industry itself.
Even when we take heed of all the safety regulations, give consideration to the warnings, lives and boats are lost.
The elements will not be denied their due, it would seem.
A list of lost fishing vessels of the Oregon and Washington coast and Columbia River Bar from Bill Brooks' shipwreck chart Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
Detail of the lost fishing vessels list, printed using an antique letter press and using handmade paper.
Each name on the list, which is included on the framed version of “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” by NW Limited…History in VogueTM represents a story, fates intertwined, never to be forgotten, and always respected.

Links:
NTSB Press Release Update on the Sinking of the Taki-Tooo
Coast Guard Safety Alert
Northwest Sea Disasters: Beyond Acceptable Risk
9 Die in Oregon Boat Accident (CBS News)

West coast fishery most deadly

An AP article published April 25, 2008 claims that the coasts of Oregon, Washington and California have claimed more lives even than Alaska waters, including the Bering Sea, where Discovery Channel’s Deadliest Catch is filmed. (Click to read the article)
“The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health released a report Thursday detailing the hazards of fishing off the coasts of California, Oregon and Washington. The report said those three states combined for a fatality rate more than twice as high as the national commercial fishing average between the years of 2000 and 2006.”
One of the somber features of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard includes a list of lost fishing vessels from the region. It is the most complete list of lost fishing vessels to date. The list was obtained from multiple local, long-time fishermen, their families, local publications and Coast Guard reports.
A list of lost fishing vessels from the Oregon and Washington coast
A detail photo of the lost fishing vessels list, printed on handmade paper using an antique letter press by Oblation Papers in Portland, Oregon.
The result is a respectful, enduring memorial to the lives lost in the commercial fishing industry of the Oregon and Washington coasts.
The list is featured on the premium framed chart by NW Limited…History in VogueTM as shown below:

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard by NW Limited...History in Vogue of Astoria, Oregon

503-338-6056 or bill@nwlimited.com to find out more

Cannons from USS Shark topic of event at Columbia River Maritime Museum

At 2:30 pm Saturday, March 22, historian Greg Shine of the Fort Vancouver National Site, gave a free, public speech about the cannons, or carronades, that were recently found at the Arch Cape, Oregon beach.  David Pearson, curator for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, spoke afterward about conservation and restoration efforts.
They are believed to have come from the 1846 wreck of the USS Shark, a Navy research schooner.
Below are a few photographs (click for larger images) we took while visiting the Nehalem Bay park at the State Park-hosted viewing of the carronades (they are being kept constantly immersed in water, to prevent further damage before restoration begins):

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.

The event took place at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 792 Marine Dr. in Astoria, Oregon.
If you’re at the coast on vacation, the Columbia River Maritime Museum is a terrific place to start your adventure, and get an inside look at shipwrecks, shipwreck history, sailing and fishing historic memorabilia, and the story of this region’s maritime history in general. The gift shop has a terrific (and the newest, best and probably biggest!) shipwreck chart you can take home with you…Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
For more about the chart, visit Dead Reckoning for images, but you really have to experience it in person to get the full experience.
For that privilege, you can call Bill, email, or catch us at one of the events where we are in attendance.

Links to news articles:
Fort Vancouver expert to shed light on recently found cannons
Navy still owns cannons found from 1846 shipwreck
Links to the co-sponsors of this event:
Fort Vancouver National Site
Northwest Cultural Resources Institute
Hosting the event:
Columbia River Maritime Museum

Dead Reckoning, what it is

…other than the short version title of NW Limited’s shipwreck chart.
(a click on that link will take you to a slideshow of images with accompanying radio ad for the chart)

Dead reckoning (DR) is the process of estimating one’s current position based upon a previously determined position, or fix, and advancing that position based upon known speed, elapsed time, and course.”  (from Wikipedia)
The term, which is where Bill derived the title of his most recent project,  sounds ominous enough.
Rightly so when you consider that a good percentage of shipwrecks resulted in loss of life, sometimes on a tragically large scale. 
Dead reckoning as a form of navigation is only so accurate. 

It is interpreted in some circles as “You’re dead if you don’t reckon right.” 

It’s a sure thing, however, to score one of these for yourself.  
As a gift, they will make a lasting impression.  
Not to mention you’ll get shipwreck author Don Marshall’s quote concerning Dead Reckoning, printed at the top of each chart.
Available in three variations:


Lithograph on high-quality paper (this is no mere “poster”): $50

Custom-framed as well as coated with vinyl linen for protection (no glass necessary): $225

The top of the line (shown above), the pinnacle of shipwreck history complete with photos, handmade paper accents (list of lost fishing vessels), stamps and more: $500

1000 total first printing “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” charts are available.
This is the perfect gift, acquisition, or investment in local history and culture.
A stellar complement to the “beach house” or a respectful nod to the intrepid souls who lost their lives in the maritime industry, and to those that beat the odds.

Detail of lost fishing vessels list, on handmade paper using an antique letterpress by Oblation Papers and Press of Portland, Oregon.
For more information,  call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com
NW Limited…History in VogueTM accepts credit cards, and will ship, too!

March in the Pacific Graveyard

“George W. Prescott -3/9/1902- Schooner: Founders off the Columbia- 1 dead”

106 years ago on this day in history, the Pacific Graveyard claimed another life and ship. The insatiable appetite of the river’s mouth is plainly evident on the shipwreck chart by NW Limited…History in VogueTM.
The names listed there represent so much more than initially meets the eye…


The next day, March 10, in 1875 the bark Architect was lost. $8500 ( approximately $154,136.99 by today’s reckoning) worth of ship was salvaged for a paltry $52.00 (or $942.96 today).
Just five years later, the Delharrie would also be lost, and $112,000 investment is gone. That would be akin to a  $2,463,824.00 loss in 2008.Luckily, these events are less frequent now, with the advent of dredging and modern navigation aids.  The challenges of fog, weather and shifting channels have been minimized, not to mention the mitigating presence of the United States Coast Guard.
The Columbia River bar, known aptly as the Pacific Graveyard will never be fully appeased, however, and continues to claim lives and vessels.

Framed, matted with photographs,
stamps and the list of lost fishing vessels,
to name a few of the extras you get with
this shipwreck chart option.

$500 (that’s $27.57 in 1875 money)

Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay

March 7, 2008 marked Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay’s 100-year Anniversary!
On this date in 1908, Barview Lifesaving Station was established on the then-largest unprotected section of Oregon coastline. 
Capt. Robert Farley was the Keeper, beginning Mar. 7, 1908 and served in that capacity until May of 1934.
The original station was located one and a half miles north of Garibaldi.  Sold to a private party in 1942, another was then built. 
In 1981,  Station Tillamook Bay was inaugurated along with a boathouse and haul-out facility.
Historic photographs, movies, and the station’s scrap book were displayed as part of the celebration.  A search-and-rescue demonstration was planned as well as tours of boats, station and equipment. 
NW Limited was there to honor this prestigious occasion!  
Here are a few pictures:

A memorial to the 11 lives lost on the Taki Tooo and other boats and lives lost on the Tillamook Bar (seen in the distance behind the memorial itself on the horizon)

The bell from the wreck of the Glenesslin, one of the most famous shipwrecks along this stretch of coastline.

SAR demonstration, which is tricky in any kind of weather…just imagine the wind blowing 70 knots and swells of 30 ft. It happens! These are the guys to call!

Just one of the many pages of memorabilia representing events these men and women have responded to. If you click the image above, it should bring up a readable image.
The personal notes from the loved ones of the lost lives are heartbreaking, but represent the very real risk in light of life amidst the elements of the Oregon coast.

NW Limited’s “Dead Reckoning” chart was one of the stars of this presentation of Oregon coast and Coast Guard history, and received much admiration for the sheer volume of history presented in such a beautiful manner.
(Click on the above photo to be taken to a slide show with more photos from the event.)
The United States Coast Guard provides our country with priceless dedication to patrolling our waterways, performing above and beyond the call of duty to ensure safety of boaters, the public, also security of country.
We at NW Limited…History in VogueTM thank you for that, and for including us in your special day.

Links:
The United States Coast Guard History in the Columbia River Area
U.S. Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay to Celebrate 100-year anniversary March 7 (Daily Astorian)
USCG Station Tillamook Bay Area Familiarization Photo Gallery

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart

The “Pacific Graveyard” has been claiming victims ever since man endeavored to set sail over these treacherous waters. 
Ships, boats, men and cargo have been lost over centuries.
Bill Brooks spent the better part of four years researching this chart, and fine-tuning every aspect. 
There were literally oceans of material to sort through and condense into what you see before you, “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.” 
Dead Reckoning is a gathering of unprecedented proportions, a gift of local maritime history.

Here is a preview  (click for slideshow and to hear the radio ad currently running) of what you’ll receive if you purchase one for yourself (click on the image and you’ll be able to almost read the text and get a better idea of the infinite detail in these handsome lithographs):



Framed version #3 of 500  “Framed tube” $225 Lithograph-$50
           $500. 

Much of this region’s history revolves around the sea.
Even before Lewis & Clark’s arrival, there are records of shipwrecks, and of their mysterious circumstances; tales of treasure, heroic survival and tragic losses.
Within this one document you will find the stories of hundreds of Oregon and Washington shipwrecks.
Enough to whet your intellectual appetite, and quench your thirst for American history as well as staunch your cravings for a visual feast for they are truly a work of art.

Available now through NW Limited…History in VogueTM
call 503-338-6056 

In Portland, Oregon

Happy Leap Day from NW Limited…History in VogueTM!

Our weekend at the Portland Expo-Mart is now complete.

There was lots of greatness displayed to the teeming masses, including Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart:   The ultimate in shipwreck memorabilia; tales of tragedy and intriguing mysteries are presented within this four-year gathering of history.
The Beatles, James Bond, American Motorcycle, Jamestown, VA, Lewis & Clark, DC and Marvel Comics, USS Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Stewart…and the boxes!!! (Click for a slideshow of examples of each)
Each piece is off the chart cool, and it’s as always: First-come, first-served!
Call for your chance to view, and have:
503-338-6056 or email Bill: bill@nwlimited.com

(Paul sends a shout-out to his homies…’cuz)

Wreck of the Lupatia – Jan. 3, 1881

An excerpt from NW Limited’s ‘Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard’ chart reads:
“Lupatia -1/3/1881- British bark: A south-easterly gale throws Lupatia onto Tillamook reef; a dog survives -16 dead”

One can imagine her final hours. A bleak, January night with the wind and surf shattering her against the rocks mere weeks before the Tillamook Lighthouse, a/k/a “Terrible Tilly” was to be lit.
The crew working on construction of that lighthouse saw Lupatia’s running lights as she approached.  In the near-miss incident,  they could hear Lupatia’s crew shouting orders of “Hard apart!” as they scrambled to keep her off the rock which so desperately needed a light as warning. 
 The construction crew kindled fires, and used lanterns to try and assist the captain as he navigated the rock-strewn reef.   Narrowly missing the rock itself, she disappeared into the darkness.
Lupatia’s debris littered the rocks below the nearly complete lighthouse the following morning.  16 lives lost…
 Would her fate have been the same had her captain had that light to use as guide?
 Unlike the Peter Iredale, or the George L. Olson, nothing remains of the Lupatia, no structure to climb and explore, no resting place to visit.
NW Limited’s historic achievement of the most detailed and complete shipwreck chart to date, immortalizes her.
The lithograph alone is a great place to start when looking for shipwreck history, but the framed and matted version  (left) is an adventure of its own with its photographs of shipwrecks, United States Coast Guard insignia and USPS stamp, the lost fishing vessels and more, all displayed within a high-quality, hand-finished frame.

Each chart is custom-built by Bill Brooks of NW Limited in Astoria, Oregon and no two will be exactly alike.
While you can’t take home the George L. Olson,
or the bowsprit of the Peter Iredale, you can
have “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” your own magnificent gathering of maritime history in the Pacific Northwest.
bill@nwlimited.com or 503-338-8215