Experience

 

 

the

 WOW!

(click on the “wow” for our gallery)

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

History is happenin’

Visiting Clatsop County (Seaside, Astoria, Warrenton) this weekend?  Vacationing on the Long Beach Peninsula?
Maybe you live here and want to find something interesting to experience, or immortalize your memories for posterity.
These events will interest you:

The Oregon Encyclopedia Project is seeking Astoria residents to contribute ideas to their online Encyclopedia from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Astoria’s Public Library.
The 50th Anniversary of Ft. Clatsop is being celebrated at the Lewis & Clark National Historic Park.
Columbia River Maritime Museum has a “Steamboats of the Columbia” exhibit that will intrigue all ages.
Hands-on History Tours of Battery Russell at Ft. Stevens.
There’s also Victorian Vogue at Astoria’s Heritage Museum.
History in VogueTM is at Astoria’s Sunday Market for a piece of history you can take home with you.
Links:
History in Vogue
Ft. Stevens Information
Astoria’s Heritage Museum
Coast Weekend
Oregon Encyclopedia asks “What is Oregon?”

On the radio today KAST 1370

Did you catch it?
Tuned to KAST am Radio 1370  from 4 pm to 5 pm, you would have heard Bill Brooks of NW Limited as a guest on the Dezmo Zone.

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart

The “Pacific Graveyard” has been claiming victims ever since man endeavored to set sail over these treacherous waters. 
Ships, boats, men and cargo have been lost over centuries.
Bill Brooks spent the better part of four years researching this chart, and fine-tuning every aspect. 
There were literally oceans of material to sort through and condense into what you see before you, “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.” 
Dead Reckoning is a gathering of unprecedented proportions, a gift of local maritime history.

Here is a preview  (click for slideshow and to hear the radio ad currently running) of what you’ll receive if you purchase one for yourself (click on the image and you’ll be able to almost read the text and get a better idea of the infinite detail in these handsome lithographs):



Framed version #3 of 500  “Framed tube” $225 Lithograph-$50
           $500. 

Much of this region’s history revolves around the sea.
Even before Lewis & Clark’s arrival, there are records of shipwrecks, and of their mysterious circumstances; tales of treasure, heroic survival and tragic losses.
Within this one document you will find the stories of hundreds of Oregon and Washington shipwrecks.
Enough to whet your intellectual appetite, and quench your thirst for American history as well as staunch your cravings for a visual feast for they are truly a work of art.

Available now through NW Limited…History in VogueTM
call 503-338-6056 

In Portland, Oregon

Happy Leap Day from NW Limited…History in VogueTM!

Our weekend at the Portland Expo-Mart is now complete.

There was lots of greatness displayed to the teeming masses, including Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart:   The ultimate in shipwreck memorabilia; tales of tragedy and intriguing mysteries are presented within this four-year gathering of history.
The Beatles, James Bond, American Motorcycle, Jamestown, VA, Lewis & Clark, DC and Marvel Comics, USS Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Stewart…and the boxes!!! (Click for a slideshow of examples of each)
Each piece is off the chart cool, and it’s as always: First-come, first-served!
Call for your chance to view, and have:
503-338-6056 or email Bill: bill@nwlimited.com

(Paul sends a shout-out to his homies…’cuz)

Fishing for words?

If you’re in town for the 11th annual Fisher Poet’s Gathering, you might come on up to NW Limited…History in VogueTM and have a look at our newest offering of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, featuring a list of the lost fishing vessels from the region. We are just two minutes from downtown on the hillside overlooking the Columbia River. Call for your appointment: 503-338-6056
The commercial fishing industry is a dangerous one, and while many of the boats on the list went down without a life lost (and often thanks to the heroic United States Coast Guard), there will always be those vessel names associated with the sudden loss of peers.
The list of fishing vessels is featured on handmade paper, and printed using an antique letter press; giving a tactile depth to the dates and the names which are so evocative of a way of life on the edge.
This is just one aspect of this magnificent gathering of maritime history, one which encompasses the lives of those we lost while working on the sea, and the memories we all share as part of this community. 
The list of lost vessels in itself speaks volumes of the ultimate price paid for the living made on the sea.  Where words fail, all that is needed are the dates and the names…most of us know the rest.
Custom tributes within this run of 500 matted, framed charts are more than welcome, since each framed chart is hand-built and assembled right here in Astoria, Oregon.
Call or email Bill to see how we can immortalize your memories. 503-338-6056

Captivating shipwrecks…

Updating this post again since there is more information coming in:

The mystery of the Coos Bay shipwreck has been solved, even as more have been revealed. 
Rumors of treasure and the possibility of finding more historic artifacts on the beaches of Oregon and Washington continues.
A local puzzler has been the whereabouts of the Peter Iredale’s bowsprit, which parted company from the main section of the shipwreck decades ago.  It turns out that the bowsprit was right in Ft. Stevens Park all along (click link for news story).
2007’s mega-storm is apparently not finished giving in the form of historic intrigue along the Oregon (and Washington) coasts.

(Detail area showing the mouth of the Columbia River, where the USS Shark met her fate in 1846)
The “ghost ship” discovered in January near Coos Bay, Oregon has turned out to be the George L. Olson, which ran aground in 1944. She was a 223-foot long steam schooner originally launched in 1917.
The pre-Civil War era cannons (which are not really cannons, but carronades) found near Arch Cape, Oregon, over the Presidents Day weekend are believed to be part of the USS Shark’s  carronade
The USS Shark attempted to cross the Columbia River bar in 1846, and failed, grounding then sinking there.
Luckily no lives were lost, but all her cargo including a box containing $4,000 are missing. After 162 years, the cannons found this past weekend are in remarkably good shape.
Is it possible that the cash box from the USS Shark is still waiting to be found?
Two more wrecks have also risen from the sands:  
The Acme is located north of Bandon, Oregon, near Cut Creek.  She went aground on Halloween in 1924 when her captain missed the river’s entrance in foggy conditions.  416 tons of schooner was burned once most everything was salvaged, but she refuses to disappear entirely.

Photo courtesy of Dick Mason of Florence, OR from his page on Oregon Shores’ Coast Watch mile post 169
The wreck of the Bella surfaced south of where the Siuslaw River empties into the ocean at Florence, Oregon. Bella was wrecked in 1905.  She appears to be in the process of disappearing beneath the sand again. 
Dick wrote that there is another wreck visible near Florence. It’s a wooden hull, possibly the bow or stern, about 30-40′ barely visible. Here are the pictures he sent of what’s left:
The location is next to the Siuslaw River North Jetty, in the mudflat about 50 yards east of the Coast Guard observation tower.
Visible at low and minus tides, and in a deteriorated state.
Photos of the mystery shipwreck are also used by permission from the photographer, Dick Mason.
Could she be the “Wilhelmina,” or any of 13 other wrecks known to be in the area?

A fifth wreck is known to be lurking in Siletz Bay, waiting to re-surface, and researchers are eager for that occasion so they can determine the origin.
This spate of stories leaves one to wonder about what is still buried in the sands, or preserved in the chill waters off the Oregon and Washington coasts, waiting for the right time to be discovered.
The Pacific Graveyard is far from done collecting its due, but it is always providing us with volumes of intriguing stories, and clues to our history, in exchange.
What else might we discover as time passes and the wind, sand and sea roll over the remains of our hidden maritime history?
Whatever that may be, it’s clear that shipwrecks have cast a spell over all our imaginations, and captured our attentions.

Links to news stories and sources:
Shipwreck stories at World Link
Shipwreck resurfaces in Bandon
Two New Shipwrecks Have Emerged
One Shipwreck Mystery Solved, Two More Appear
Awash With Mystery
Shipwreck Mystery Intrigues Ocean Shores
Experts wonder what’s unearthing coastal treasures (Eugene Register-Guard
Shipwreck Registry
Tall Ships of San Francisco

Shipwreck Discoveries Continue to Intrigue Beachcombers…

Shipwrecks as history are in vogue, for they are in the news frequently of late. 
Public interest is obvious in the flocks of visitors to see the mystery shipwreck which recently appeared in the Coos Bay area.
  More previously-lost bits of ships are turning up. The unprecedented churning of December’s big storms may be partly to blame.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

 In December 2007, a partially-burned shipwreck piece washed ashore near Ocean Shores, Washington.  No identity has been determined for that wreck.  Could it be a vessel previously unidentified, or is it a part of a known shipwreck?

 At left,  one of many featured photos from the framed, matted version of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, depicting the Frank W. Howe, which ran aground on North Head.  Two lives were lost as well as the ship and cargo of lumber.

On Presidents Day, two cannons were discovered near Arch Cape, Oregon.
They are believed to be from the USS Shark, a war ship/survey schooner which attempted to cross the Columbia River bar in 1846, and sank there.
The ship is listed in her rightful place on Dead
Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
which is the most detailed, most beautiful shipwreck chart created to date by Bill Brooks of NW Limited…History in VogueTM.

Bill’s contribution to local history, as well as local culture are commendable for the sheer volume of information available here. 
It must be seen to be believed!

(detail below of the mouth of the river portion of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, showing the USS Shark among the multitude of others)

She may have been wrecked at the mouth of the Columbia, but where the USS Shark’s cannons ended up were a secret which the elements chose now to reveal….
or is it the beginning of another saga, the story of another shipwreck altogether?

The discoveries of these wrecks and their wreckage are significant in that these events are the story of all of us, of communities, places and people.  They are a part of our past, present and future.  History. In Vogue!
This quote from the the Oregonian Oregon Blog Live site illustrates well the concept of how shipwrecks have far-reaching effects:
“After it wrecked, part of the ship’s wreckage came ashore near Hug Point. A trio of carronades was among the wreckage. At the time, a Navy sailor was sent to recover the wreckage but he was able to reclaim only one of the cannons. He moved it to higher ground, but it eventually was covered in sand and disappeared until 1898 when it washed ashore. That cannon later became the namesake of Cannon Beach. ”
Archaeologists are requesting that visitors leave the relics where they lie, and not disturb them so that they can better determine their origin. You can, however, have your very own shipwreck chart, which is even better with all the “extras” you will receive in the framed version. (click this link for a preview of this amazing piece of history)
$50 for the lithograph in a tube, and $500 for the framed, matted, intensively detailed version.  There will be 500 of each available. 
Call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com  to find out more.

KGW News: Hands off historic cannons near Cannon Beach, archeologists say
OPB News: Beachcombers Find Cannons on Oregon Beach
Pair of Cannons Found on Oregon Coast Could Be From 1846 Ship
Mystery Ship Revealed in Deep Sand Near Coos Bay, OR

149 years young, Oregon experiences a first

February 14, 2008. As of today, on its 149th anniversary of statehood, the 33rd state of the union, Oregon joins Arkansas, Tennessee, Georgia and New York and gets its very own online encyclopedia. The Oregon Encyclopedia of History and Culture is up and running! For those of us that love history, the Valentine’s Day debut is more than appropriate. Many claim a passion for historic subject matter for its cultural significance as well as overall fascination with the state they live in. The stories are captivating and inspiring.
If you’re in Portland, Oregon, today at 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm, you are invited to attend a free launch event for the Oregon Encyclopedia. There will be readings, refreshments and music. If not, you could always celebrate with a little History in VogueTM and find yourself the lucky owner of a Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart, a Lewis & Clark States, Indian Nations or black map!. Since they were created for the 1804, 5 and 6 bicentennial in 2005-2006 and are running near the end of their limited numbers, they would be an amazing way to express and indulge your fondness for Oregon history. Show some love, already!
Quoted from their February 14 press release: “The Oregon Encyclopedia will include entries on all parts of the state, with special attention to smaller communities. It will include information on Oregon history, art, architecture, literature, anthropology, ethnology, folklore, and more. Encyclopedia editors and staff will involve as many local communities as possible by gathering information through community meetings. The first meeting will be held this spring in Coos Bay and Madras, with others taking place throughout Oregon over the next year.”
Their mission statement, taken from the infant website, reflects an ideal goal: “The Oregon Encyclopedia of History and Culture provides definitive, general information about the State of Oregon, its places, culture, institutions, significant events, and the people that shaped them. The user-friendly electronic format is intended for use by students, teachers, researchers, and general information-seekers.”
This event is a historic first, inspired by the Oregon Sesquicentennial of 2009. Their goal is 3000 entries by the end of the year, even though the offerings now may seem a bit on the lean side. It is hoped that contributors will flesh out the site with their various areas of expertise. Since oft-forgotten events will be featured, and focus will be on smaller communities, the site has great potential for seekers of the obscure.
For example, there are thousands of sites, probably more, relating to the Lewis & Clark Exposition, but if you go looking for the identity of the remains of a recent Coos Bay shipwreck, you will find that particular moniker lost to the sands of time. Perhaps it played some role in Oregon’s rich cultural past. Or not. Regardless, it is historically significant, and has Oregonians intrigued.
In researching his Dead Reckoning shipwreck chart, Bill Brooks was up against a
mountain much like the wreck of the Glenesslin found herself in 1913.
There is no one place to find definitive answers. There was much speculation, rumor, conflicting information as well as misinformation to sift through, and certainly no Oregon Online Encyclopedia to refer to with a simple click of the mouse. 
Yes, it was a monstrous undertaking, but it is now complete and ready for its Close up. What do wows taste like, anyway?
Happy Birth Day, Oregon Encyclopedia!
Long may you thrive and keep growing,
because history is happenin’!

                                                                                     The wreck of the Glenesslin at the base of Neahkahnie Mountain in 1913

News Links:
Oregon Encyclopedia Launch Event (press release)
Historians Launch First-Ever Encyclopedia of Oregon