Astoria, Oregon historic photographs

 These five will join another set of framed, historic photographs and of course a Dead Reckoning shipwreck chart that Bill built as customs to hang in the Clatsop County Courthouse in Astoria, Oregon.

Various images depicting scenes from Astorias rich, historic past

Various images depicting scenes from Astoria's rich, historic past - a custom, part of a set to accompany a framed, shipwreck chart

The first three with framed chart

The first three with framed chart

Nobody frames history like we do!
Wander on over to the website and see what’s available.

We have Oregon, Washington local historic events and autographed, entertainment events with national, even global appeal, all made right here in Astoria, OR.

 

Email: bill@nwlimited.com or phone 503-338-6056

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Galleries

Slideshows!
Here’s a list of our flash galleries illustrating a sampling of the vast range of historic events we cover, and have covered.
From one of ones to one in a thousand, all are unique, and any can be customized for you (click on the big, bold words to be transported):

An overview of all editions and customs: WOW
Our shipwreck chart of the Oregon and Washington coasts: Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
American Motorcycle edition of 90: American Motorcycle
And a sampling of the builds to date within our edition of 90 Beatles tributesThe Beatles

Email Bill Brooks to inquire, or phone 503-338-6056
More soon…

History is happenin’

Visiting Clatsop County (Seaside, Astoria, Warrenton) this weekend?  Vacationing on the Long Beach Peninsula?
Maybe you live here and want to find something interesting to experience, or immortalize your memories for posterity.
These events will interest you:

The Oregon Encyclopedia Project is seeking Astoria residents to contribute ideas to their online Encyclopedia from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Astoria’s Public Library.
The 50th Anniversary of Ft. Clatsop is being celebrated at the Lewis & Clark National Historic Park.
Columbia River Maritime Museum has a “Steamboats of the Columbia” exhibit that will intrigue all ages.
Hands-on History Tours of Battery Russell at Ft. Stevens.
There’s also Victorian Vogue at Astoria’s Heritage Museum.
History in VogueTM is at Astoria’s Sunday Market for a piece of history you can take home with you.
Links:
History in Vogue
Ft. Stevens Information
Astoria’s Heritage Museum
Coast Weekend
Oregon Encyclopedia asks “What is Oregon?”

Lewis and Clark – the journey home

began two hundred and two years ago today on March 23, 1806.
Fort Clatsop was presented to the Indians for which it was named, and the expedition turned homeward.
Excerpts from Lewis and Clark’s respective journals read as follows:

March 23, 1806
Meriwether Lewis
at 1 P.M. we bid a final adieu to Fort Clatsop. we had not proceeded more than a mile before we met Delashelwilt and a party of 20 Chinnooks men and women. this Cheif lea[r]ning that we were in want of a canoe some days past, had brought us one for sale, but being already supplyed, we did not purchase it.

March 23, 1806
William Clark
at this place we had wintered and remained from the 7th of Decr. 1805 to this day and have lived as well as we had any right to expect, and we can say that we were never one day without 3 meals of some kind a day either pore Elk meat or roots, notwithstanding the repeated fall of rain which has fallen almost constantly since we passed the long narrows … indeed w[e] have had only [blank space in MS.] days fair weather since that time.”

Their journey had begun on May 14, 1804, and would end September 23, 1806 in St. Louis.
The Corps of Discovery was successful and history forever changed when the information they gathered, the territories they explored and mapped were reported upon their return.
Two hundred years later, the USPS would issue commemorative stamps to celebrate the bicentennial, as well as multiple first-day-of-issue postmarks.
These are featured here on the matting around a map of the expedition overlaid with the outline of present-day states, giving you a unique perspective at the magnitude of this heroic feat:

Lewis and Clark States Map by NW Limited…History in VogueTM $ $25000

Today, when you set out to scurry about the backyard looking for what the Easter bunny left behind…don’t forget those who forged a path in a new frontier, for the greater good.

All three Lewis & Clark maps by NW Limited.
(States, Black Map and Indian Nations)  Sweet dreams are made of this.

Links:
The Lewis & Clark Maps (you can purchase these directly from Bill by calling 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com)
Lewis & Clark at PBS

Cannons from USS Shark topic of event at Columbia River Maritime Museum

At 2:30 pm Saturday, March 22, historian Greg Shine of the Fort Vancouver National Site, gave a free, public speech about the cannons, or carronades, that were recently found at the Arch Cape, Oregon beach.  David Pearson, curator for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, spoke afterward about conservation and restoration efforts.
They are believed to have come from the 1846 wreck of the USS Shark, a Navy research schooner.
Below are a few photographs (click for larger images) we took while visiting the Nehalem Bay park at the State Park-hosted viewing of the carronades (they are being kept constantly immersed in water, to prevent further damage before restoration begins):

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.

The event took place at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 792 Marine Dr. in Astoria, Oregon.
If you’re at the coast on vacation, the Columbia River Maritime Museum is a terrific place to start your adventure, and get an inside look at shipwrecks, shipwreck history, sailing and fishing historic memorabilia, and the story of this region’s maritime history in general. The gift shop has a terrific (and the newest, best and probably biggest!) shipwreck chart you can take home with you…Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
For more about the chart, visit Dead Reckoning for images, but you really have to experience it in person to get the full experience.
For that privilege, you can call Bill, email, or catch us at one of the events where we are in attendance.

Links to news articles:
Fort Vancouver expert to shed light on recently found cannons
Navy still owns cannons found from 1846 shipwreck
Links to the co-sponsors of this event:
Fort Vancouver National Site
Northwest Cultural Resources Institute
Hosting the event:
Columbia River Maritime Museum

Cannon found on beach to go on display

The carronades found last month, which are potentially from the USS Shark went on display to the public at Nehalem Bay State Park on March 18 from 11 a.m. until Noon, and NW Limited was there!

The USS Shark, a Navy survey schooner, sank in 1846, as listed on “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” NW Limited‘s new shipwreck chart
One of the carronades,  found on the beach in 1898 was what inspired founders to name “Cannon Beach” exactly that.
Come see…all aboard for a road trip!

More information at these links:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. information page for the cannon
Oregon Coast: Cannon Artifacts Open for Public Viewing March 18

On the radio today KAST 1370

Did you catch it?
Tuned to KAST am Radio 1370  from 4 pm to 5 pm, you would have heard Bill Brooks of NW Limited as a guest on the Dezmo Zone.

March in the Pacific Graveyard

“George W. Prescott -3/9/1902- Schooner: Founders off the Columbia- 1 dead”

106 years ago on this day in history, the Pacific Graveyard claimed another life and ship. The insatiable appetite of the river’s mouth is plainly evident on the shipwreck chart by NW Limited…History in VogueTM.
The names listed there represent so much more than initially meets the eye…


The next day, March 10, in 1875 the bark Architect was lost. $8500 ( approximately $154,136.99 by today’s reckoning) worth of ship was salvaged for a paltry $52.00 (or $942.96 today).
Just five years later, the Delharrie would also be lost, and $112,000 investment is gone. That would be akin to a  $2,463,824.00 loss in 2008.Luckily, these events are less frequent now, with the advent of dredging and modern navigation aids.  The challenges of fog, weather and shifting channels have been minimized, not to mention the mitigating presence of the United States Coast Guard.
The Columbia River bar, known aptly as the Pacific Graveyard will never be fully appeased, however, and continues to claim lives and vessels.

Framed, matted with photographs,
stamps and the list of lost fishing vessels,
to name a few of the extras you get with
this shipwreck chart option.

$500 (that’s $27.57 in 1875 money)

Saving daylight, or losing sleep?

Don’t forget to push your clocks forward one hour tonight before you hit the sack.
NW Limited offers you this special “lost hour” deal:


FREE custom-made box,
Made in the USA
(just like the contents)
with your purchase. 

No buyer’s remorse in here!

We all know the box is the
best part of any new toy, anyway.

These boxes are without peer.

The question is:
What will be in this amazing box,
when you open yours? 
That is up to you…

Link:
Daylight Savings Time 
(from the Astronomical Applications Dept. of the U.S. Navy)

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart

The “Pacific Graveyard” has been claiming victims ever since man endeavored to set sail over these treacherous waters. 
Ships, boats, men and cargo have been lost over centuries.
Bill Brooks spent the better part of four years researching this chart, and fine-tuning every aspect. 
There were literally oceans of material to sort through and condense into what you see before you, “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.” 
Dead Reckoning is a gathering of unprecedented proportions, a gift of local maritime history.

Here is a preview  (click for slideshow and to hear the radio ad currently running) of what you’ll receive if you purchase one for yourself (click on the image and you’ll be able to almost read the text and get a better idea of the infinite detail in these handsome lithographs):



Framed version #3 of 500  “Framed tube” $225 Lithograph-$50
           $500. 

Much of this region’s history revolves around the sea.
Even before Lewis & Clark’s arrival, there are records of shipwrecks, and of their mysterious circumstances; tales of treasure, heroic survival and tragic losses.
Within this one document you will find the stories of hundreds of Oregon and Washington shipwrecks.
Enough to whet your intellectual appetite, and quench your thirst for American history as well as staunch your cravings for a visual feast for they are truly a work of art.

Available now through NW Limited…History in VogueTM
call 503-338-6056