The Beeswax wreck: First European wreck on the NW Coast

From the olyblog.net:
A public presentation by archaeologist Scott S. Williams

Monday, Oct. 20, 2008 at Noon

State Capital Museum and Outreach Center, 211 – 21st Ave. SW, Olympia
(360) 753-2580

Sometime in the late 17th century a Manila Galleon, carrying tons of beeswax and other cargo destined for the colonies of New Spain, wrecked on the Oregon coast near Nehalem Spit.
Clatsop Indian oral histories tell of the shipwreck and its survivors. Over time the Indians incorporated the cargo into their trading and daily lives. This presentation by Scott S. Williams (Cultural Resources Program manager at WSDOT) will discuss on-going investigations to locate the mysterious wreck and document it.

This public program is part of the “Adventures in Northwest History and Archaeology” series at the State Capital Museum.

Admission to each lecture is $2.

You are welcome to bring lunch. Coffee and tea will be served.

Links:
Oly Blog article
Dead Reckoning the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart at NW Limited…History in Vogue

USS Shark Cannons-History in Cannon Beach Wednesday

Can you find the Shark on this small section of our chart representing the Columbia River Bar area and some of the shipwrecks there?

Can you find the Shark on this small section of our chart representing the Columbia River Bar area and some of the shipwrecks there?

On Wednesday, August 13, the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum will host a lecture by Greg Shine on the cannons discovered in Arch Cape in February 2008,/a>. Shine is the Chief Ranger and Historian at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and the Northwest Cultural Resources Institute. This free, public program will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the History Center.
The cannons are believed to be from the wreck of a Navy ship named the USS Shark, which was surveying the Columbia River Bar when it struck a shoal and ultimately sunk in 1846.
For more information about the program, please call the Cannon Beach History Center and Museum at 503-436-9301.
As always, you can call the office (503-338-6056), or drop by Astoria’s Sunday Market to pick up a souvenir of your visit, our
Dead Reckoning shipwreck chart, the newest and most complete listing of shipwrecks for this region, presented in a beautiful lithograph on high-quality paper, and the ultimate which is framed and has photographs of the wrecks and other historic memorabilia such as lighthouses.

Links:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart at NW Limited…History in Vogue
Hear the stories of the USS Shark
Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: Arch Cape Cannons
Cannon Lecture on North Oregon Coast Beach Connection.net

Trash or treasure?

The New Carissa is getting another set of walking papers.
Removal is slated to begin this week.
The goal is to have her gone, but she won’t soon be forgotten.
Nine years have passed since the 1500-ton ship hit the beach north of Coos Bay, during a February storm.  Her carcass remains a grim reminder that shipwrecks are not just history, they are a fact of life in the maritime industry.
Lacking the charm of some of the more recent, historic wrecks that have surfaced, the New Carissa is considered to be more of an eyesore to some. There is argument to the contrary…
The ship’s wreckage should be completely removed by October, along with the expenditure of $16.4 million more dollars.
Whether you’re going to get a last look at the New Carissa, or a peek at the newly revealed George L. Olson, the Bella, Acme, possibly to search for something new from the USS Shark,  be cautious, and mind the dangerous surf at the Oregon coast.
The same holds true for Washington’s beaches, of course.
Lost treasure, history and sightseeing may be the lure, but danger lurks for more than just boats and ships.

Still, it begs the question: What might the M/V New Carissa look like in 100 years or so?

The shipwreck Peter Iredale (photo ca. 1/2008), grounded in 1906,
is considered a local treasure for its tourist
attraction and aesthetic interest.


102 years ago…

The New Carissa today…(taken from the KCBY website)

Links:
Shipwreck set for wrecking (Eugene Register-Guard)
Beach explorers urged to keep eye on ocean(Newport News-Times)
Hoping to save the New Carissa shipwreck (KCBY)

Cannons from USS Shark topic of event at Columbia River Maritime Museum

At 2:30 pm Saturday, March 22, historian Greg Shine of the Fort Vancouver National Site, gave a free, public speech about the cannons, or carronades, that were recently found at the Arch Cape, Oregon beach.  David Pearson, curator for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, spoke afterward about conservation and restoration efforts.
They are believed to have come from the 1846 wreck of the USS Shark, a Navy research schooner.
Below are a few photographs (click for larger images) we took while visiting the Nehalem Bay park at the State Park-hosted viewing of the carronades (they are being kept constantly immersed in water, to prevent further damage before restoration begins):

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.

The event took place at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 792 Marine Dr. in Astoria, Oregon.
If you’re at the coast on vacation, the Columbia River Maritime Museum is a terrific place to start your adventure, and get an inside look at shipwrecks, shipwreck history, sailing and fishing historic memorabilia, and the story of this region’s maritime history in general. The gift shop has a terrific (and the newest, best and probably biggest!) shipwreck chart you can take home with you…Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
For more about the chart, visit Dead Reckoning for images, but you really have to experience it in person to get the full experience.
For that privilege, you can call Bill, email, or catch us at one of the events where we are in attendance.

Links to news articles:
Fort Vancouver expert to shed light on recently found cannons
Navy still owns cannons found from 1846 shipwreck
Links to the co-sponsors of this event:
Fort Vancouver National Site
Northwest Cultural Resources Institute
Hosting the event:
Columbia River Maritime Museum

Cannon found on beach to go on display

The carronades found last month, which are potentially from the USS Shark went on display to the public at Nehalem Bay State Park on March 18 from 11 a.m. until Noon, and NW Limited was there!

The USS Shark, a Navy survey schooner, sank in 1846, as listed on “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” NW Limited‘s new shipwreck chart
One of the carronades,  found on the beach in 1898 was what inspired founders to name “Cannon Beach” exactly that.
Come see…all aboard for a road trip!

More information at these links:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. information page for the cannon
Oregon Coast: Cannon Artifacts Open for Public Viewing March 18

Dead Reckoning, what it is

…other than the short version title of NW Limited’s shipwreck chart.
(a click on that link will take you to a slideshow of images with accompanying radio ad for the chart)

Dead reckoning (DR) is the process of estimating one’s current position based upon a previously determined position, or fix, and advancing that position based upon known speed, elapsed time, and course.”  (from Wikipedia)
The term, which is where Bill derived the title of his most recent project,  sounds ominous enough.
Rightly so when you consider that a good percentage of shipwrecks resulted in loss of life, sometimes on a tragically large scale. 
Dead reckoning as a form of navigation is only so accurate. 

It is interpreted in some circles as “You’re dead if you don’t reckon right.” 

It’s a sure thing, however, to score one of these for yourself.  
As a gift, they will make a lasting impression.  
Not to mention you’ll get shipwreck author Don Marshall’s quote concerning Dead Reckoning, printed at the top of each chart.
Available in three variations:


Lithograph on high-quality paper (this is no mere “poster”): $50

Custom-framed as well as coated with vinyl linen for protection (no glass necessary): $225

The top of the line (shown above), the pinnacle of shipwreck history complete with photos, handmade paper accents (list of lost fishing vessels), stamps and more: $500

1000 total first printing “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” charts are available.
This is the perfect gift, acquisition, or investment in local history and culture.
A stellar complement to the “beach house” or a respectful nod to the intrepid souls who lost their lives in the maritime industry, and to those that beat the odds.

Detail of lost fishing vessels list, on handmade paper using an antique letterpress by Oblation Papers and Press of Portland, Oregon.
For more information,  call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com
NW Limited…History in VogueTM accepts credit cards, and will ship, too!

On the radio today KAST 1370

Did you catch it?
Tuned to KAST am Radio 1370  from 4 pm to 5 pm, you would have heard Bill Brooks of NW Limited as a guest on the Dezmo Zone.

March in the Pacific Graveyard

“George W. Prescott -3/9/1902- Schooner: Founders off the Columbia- 1 dead”

106 years ago on this day in history, the Pacific Graveyard claimed another life and ship. The insatiable appetite of the river’s mouth is plainly evident on the shipwreck chart by NW Limited…History in VogueTM.
The names listed there represent so much more than initially meets the eye…


The next day, March 10, in 1875 the bark Architect was lost. $8500 ( approximately $154,136.99 by today’s reckoning) worth of ship was salvaged for a paltry $52.00 (or $942.96 today).
Just five years later, the Delharrie would also be lost, and $112,000 investment is gone. That would be akin to a  $2,463,824.00 loss in 2008.Luckily, these events are less frequent now, with the advent of dredging and modern navigation aids.  The challenges of fog, weather and shifting channels have been minimized, not to mention the mitigating presence of the United States Coast Guard.
The Columbia River bar, known aptly as the Pacific Graveyard will never be fully appeased, however, and continues to claim lives and vessels.

Framed, matted with photographs,
stamps and the list of lost fishing vessels,
to name a few of the extras you get with
this shipwreck chart option.

$500 (that’s $27.57 in 1875 money)

Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay

March 7, 2008 marked Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay’s 100-year Anniversary!
On this date in 1908, Barview Lifesaving Station was established on the then-largest unprotected section of Oregon coastline. 
Capt. Robert Farley was the Keeper, beginning Mar. 7, 1908 and served in that capacity until May of 1934.
The original station was located one and a half miles north of Garibaldi.  Sold to a private party in 1942, another was then built. 
In 1981,  Station Tillamook Bay was inaugurated along with a boathouse and haul-out facility.
Historic photographs, movies, and the station’s scrap book were displayed as part of the celebration.  A search-and-rescue demonstration was planned as well as tours of boats, station and equipment. 
NW Limited was there to honor this prestigious occasion!  
Here are a few pictures:

A memorial to the 11 lives lost on the Taki Tooo and other boats and lives lost on the Tillamook Bar (seen in the distance behind the memorial itself on the horizon)

The bell from the wreck of the Glenesslin, one of the most famous shipwrecks along this stretch of coastline.

SAR demonstration, which is tricky in any kind of weather…just imagine the wind blowing 70 knots and swells of 30 ft. It happens! These are the guys to call!

Just one of the many pages of memorabilia representing events these men and women have responded to. If you click the image above, it should bring up a readable image.
The personal notes from the loved ones of the lost lives are heartbreaking, but represent the very real risk in light of life amidst the elements of the Oregon coast.

NW Limited’s “Dead Reckoning” chart was one of the stars of this presentation of Oregon coast and Coast Guard history, and received much admiration for the sheer volume of history presented in such a beautiful manner.
(Click on the above photo to be taken to a slide show with more photos from the event.)
The United States Coast Guard provides our country with priceless dedication to patrolling our waterways, performing above and beyond the call of duty to ensure safety of boaters, the public, also security of country.
We at NW Limited…History in VogueTM thank you for that, and for including us in your special day.

Links:
The United States Coast Guard History in the Columbia River Area
U.S. Coast Guard Station Tillamook Bay to Celebrate 100-year anniversary March 7 (Daily Astorian)
USCG Station Tillamook Bay Area Familiarization Photo Gallery

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart

The “Pacific Graveyard” has been claiming victims ever since man endeavored to set sail over these treacherous waters. 
Ships, boats, men and cargo have been lost over centuries.
Bill Brooks spent the better part of four years researching this chart, and fine-tuning every aspect. 
There were literally oceans of material to sort through and condense into what you see before you, “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.” 
Dead Reckoning is a gathering of unprecedented proportions, a gift of local maritime history.

Here is a preview  (click for slideshow and to hear the radio ad currently running) of what you’ll receive if you purchase one for yourself (click on the image and you’ll be able to almost read the text and get a better idea of the infinite detail in these handsome lithographs):



Framed version #3 of 500  “Framed tube” $225 Lithograph-$50
           $500. 

Much of this region’s history revolves around the sea.
Even before Lewis & Clark’s arrival, there are records of shipwrecks, and of their mysterious circumstances; tales of treasure, heroic survival and tragic losses.
Within this one document you will find the stories of hundreds of Oregon and Washington shipwrecks.
Enough to whet your intellectual appetite, and quench your thirst for American history as well as staunch your cravings for a visual feast for they are truly a work of art.

Available now through NW Limited…History in VogueTM
call 503-338-6056