F/V Sea King, the F/V Mermaid and the USCGC Triumph

January 11, 1991 saw the loss of the fishing vessel Sea King on the Columbia River bar. The 75-foot boat capsized and sank while under tow. David Haynes was one of two fishermen, and one Coast Guardsman (Charles Sexton) died during the rescue. 

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard features a list of lost fishing vessels from the Oregon and Washington coasts (click to see it on a chart)

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard features a list of lost fishing vessels from the Oregon and Washington coasts (click to see it on a chart)

Thirty years earlier, January 12, 1961, the F/V Mermaid lost their rudder and required rescue, resulting in the loss of five Coast Guard crewmen, the two Mermaid crew, the vessel Mermaid, the USCG Motor Lifeboat Triumph and the CG Utility boat 40564 in one of the worst tragedies of the Pacific Graveyard’s history.

Links:
Author brings background to Coast Guard tragedy Olympian story on Gary Hudson’s self-published book, They Had to Go Out
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, chart featuring shipwrecks and lost fishing vessels of the area
Historic daily events in Coast Guard history, listed by month at the Patriot Files Dedicate to the preservation of military history
Charles W. Sexton (Coast Guardsman lost during the Sea King rescue)

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USCG Pterodactyls come to see the Graveyard

(reposted from The Daily Astorian’s website):
Astoria hosts Coast Guard’s Pterodactyl Roost
Annual meeting brings pilots and other flight-crew members to view the Graveyard of the Pacific

By KARA HANSEN
The Daily Astorian

About 200 U.S. Coast Guard aviators descended on Astoria as the annual Pterodactyl Roost began Thursday.

The annual meeting of the Coast Guard Aviation Association, a fraternal organization also known as Ancient Order of the Pterodactyl, brings together pilots and other flight-crew members for four days of sight-seeing at the Graveyard of the Pacific.

Vice Adm. Vivien Crea, vice commandant of the Coast Guard, will also attend part of the event. Second in command in the Coast Guard, Crea is the highest ranking woman in the history of the U.S. military.

Coast Guard Group Astoria competed against Air Station Barbers Point in Hawaii for the opportunity to play host to this year’s Roost, said Lt. Adam Davenport, an Astoria pilot.

“We sold the Pterodactyls on Astoria by showcasing its scenery, charm and high probability of breathtaking search and rescue,” he said, noting Coast Guard members cross the country to train in the rough waters at Ilwaco, Wash.’s National Motor Lifeboat School and at Astoria’s Advanced Helicopter Rescue School. “We are a destination for SAR training and experience for the entire Coast Guard, both afloat and air assets.”

Those attending the Roost will visit historic sites such as Fort Clatsop and the Doughboy Monument and filming locations from the “Goonies” and “Kindergarten Cop” movies, sample Oregon seafood and wine and explore Washington’s North Head Lighthouse and Cape Disappointment, overlooking the treacherous Columbia River bar.

They’ll also get to check out some of the Coast Guard’s newest and recently updated aircraft: the new MH-60T Thunderhawk helicopter, the HC-144 Casa search plane, an MH-65 helicopter from Air Station Port Angeles, Wash., a C-130 plane from Air Station Sacramento, Calif., and one of Air Station Astoria’s three HH-60 Jayhawk helicopters.

The event was coordinated by a committee of Coast Guard Lt. Rob Potter, Lt. Brooks Crawford, Rear Adm. Ed Nelson, Capt. Rod Leland, Cmdr. Ron Larsen and Cmdr. Malcolm Smith under the direction of Capt. Peter Troedsson, Coast Guard Group Astoria’s commander. It ends Sunday with a business meeting.

Davenport said the organization offers numerous benefits for members, mainly by helping them stay connected with Coast Guard aviation, enjoy camaraderie of former and current colleagues, network for future jobs “and promote recognition and historical preservation of all things Coast Guard aviation.”

All 19 pilots at Air Station Astoria have been members at some point. “We get invited to join upon receiving our wings,” Davenport said.

Links:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard at NW Limited…History in VogueTM
Article at Daily Astorian

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle and Privateer Lynx pictures

American flag flies at the stern of the Coast Guard Cutter Eagle
Old Glory framed against a blue sky, rippling in a northwesterly breeze and flying proudly on the United States Coast Guard cutter Eagle as she is moored alongside the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon.
Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, tall ship visiting Astoria, Oregon

 

 

The barque Eagle as seen from the Columbia River Maritime Museum on 6 June, 2008.
(Click for larger version)
Lightship Columbia, moored alongside, looks small in comparison to the 295′ long ship.

 

View of the stern of the ship, showing the draft markings at the hull

The Eagle was commissioned originally for the German Navy as the Horst Wessel in 1936.
Taken by the US as a war prize after WWII, she was re-commissioned in 1946 for the USCG.
More information on the Eagle’s history at this link
Click the image for a larger version.

 The rigging and mast of the USCG Cutter Eagle

Name plaque on the barque EagleThree ship's wheels!

The fuzzy stuff is called “baggywrinkle” and it is
designed to decrease chafing of the sailsBaggywrinkle in the rigging of the Cutter EagleThe 1812 Privateer Lynx under sail on the Columbia River

The 1812 Privateer Lynx under full sail on the Columbia River.

The tall ship Eagle turning on anchor, preparing to leave Astoria, Oregon

 

 

The USCG Cutter Eagle pivoting on anchor, turning from her Eastward-pointing direction as she prepares to depart out the mouth of the Columbia River, and navigate the waters of the Pacific Graveyard, where the bones of many ships and fishing vessels repose.

The barque pointed west on the columbia River near Astoria, Oregon
Pointed west, the barque then rides the ebb tide to the Pacific Ocean.

The USCG Cutter Eagle, escorted by an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter

The Eagle departing Astoria, escorted by an HH-60 Jayhawk helicopter.

(click image at left for a larger version)

 Links:

Pictures and video on the USCG Press Release Page
If you love maritime history, sailing and boats in general, or know someone who does, have a look at our shipwreck chart, available for purchase: Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard.
 

Respectfully remembered…

To many, the true meaning of this holiday is forgotten as we worry about kicking off the Summer season with a barbecue, or who will win the Indy 500.
Lost in the overwhelming flood of sales ads, what to wear, where to go, and concern over the cost of fuel to get there as we drive to see the in-laws.
Our founding principle is Made in the USA, and as such, we must give sacred respect for the real reason that we have a day set aside to remember those who gave it all, and the families left behind.
From Wikipedia:
“Memorial Day is a United States Federal Holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed in 2008 on May 26). It was formerly known as Decoration Day; and for many years observed on May 30, regardless of the day of the week. This holiday commemorates U.S. men and women who have died in military service to their country. It began first to honor Union soldiers who died during the American Civil War. After World War I, it was expanded to include those who died in any war or military action.”

NW Limited…History in VogueTM would like to join you in honoring these men and women who died protecting our freedom.
No matter who you want to vote for, how you want to celebrate this Memorial Day Weekend, the ones we honor in remembrance will always be the true heroes.
Our Armed Forces, The United States Navy, The United States Army, The United States Marine Corps, The United States Coast Guard are all given our sincere respect, deepest honor, and continuing support.
Many people observe this holiday by visiting cemeteries and memorials.
A national moment of remembrance takes place at 9 p.m. US Eastern time.
Another tradition is to fly the U.S. flag at half-staff from dawn until noon local time.
Every other day we exist in this country that we call home is a true holiday because of the lives given in the line of duty.
Thank you!

US Memorial Day

History comes alive

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission will welcome the public to a living-history event to celebrate the North Head Light House 110th anniversary at Cape Disappointment State Park near Ilwaco from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 17 and 18.
Historians will portray people who figured prominently in the lighthouse’s early years.
North Head light began operation May 16, 1898.
Its construction was necessitated by the high number of shipwrecks still occurring in the area, despite the existence of other lights marking the entrance to the Columbia River Bar:
Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
Enlargement of the Columbia River Bar area from NW Limited’s Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, depicting just the shipwrecks at the river’s mouth
The mouth of the river was treacherous, with deadly currents and tricky channels as well as the weather, which was prone to change. It claimed its toll in human lives as well as lost cargo.
In contrast to the countless lives saved since its inception, North Head light itself has a dark secret: In 1923, the keeper’s wife leapt from the cliff, falling 130 feet to hear death.
The lighthouse fell into disrepair in the years following the keeper’s obsolescence (the light was automated in 1961).
Luckily, the United States Coast Guard came to the rescue in 1984, and restored it, allowing it to open to the public under the direction of Cape Disappointment State Park.
Don’t miss this bit of living history, even if you can’t attend the event this weekend.

To order your shipwreck chart, call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com
We promise to give you the whole thing, not just the tiny portion shown above.

Links:
NW Limited…History in VogueTM
Living history event highlights lighthouse (Daily Astorian)
North Head Lighthouse

 

 

 

Carronades from USS Shark to be displayed

in Manzanita tomorrow, April 29, 2008 at Nehalem Bay State Park.
The small cannons are normally kept submerged in water and secured until restoration, but the Oregon Parks Dept. is draining the water and inviting visitors to come and view them from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 pm.
Here are a few photos from NW Limited’s trip to see them at the last public viewing in March:

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom of the tub are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.
The carronades even have their own blog: Cannon Blog
The USS Shark is one of the hundreds of Oregon and Washington, Columbia River shipwrecks featured on our Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard shipwreck chart.
Three versions of the chart are currently available (click the following link to see more):

Cannons from USS Shark topic of event at Columbia River Maritime Museum

At 2:30 pm Saturday, March 22, historian Greg Shine of the Fort Vancouver National Site, gave a free, public speech about the cannons, or carronades, that were recently found at the Arch Cape, Oregon beach.  David Pearson, curator for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, spoke afterward about conservation and restoration efforts.
They are believed to have come from the 1846 wreck of the USS Shark, a Navy research schooner.
Below are a few photographs (click for larger images) we took while visiting the Nehalem Bay park at the State Park-hosted viewing of the carronades (they are being kept constantly immersed in water, to prevent further damage before restoration begins):

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.

The event took place at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 792 Marine Dr. in Astoria, Oregon.
If you’re at the coast on vacation, the Columbia River Maritime Museum is a terrific place to start your adventure, and get an inside look at shipwrecks, shipwreck history, sailing and fishing historic memorabilia, and the story of this region’s maritime history in general. The gift shop has a terrific (and the newest, best and probably biggest!) shipwreck chart you can take home with you…Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
For more about the chart, visit Dead Reckoning for images, but you really have to experience it in person to get the full experience.
For that privilege, you can call Bill, email, or catch us at one of the events where we are in attendance.

Links to news articles:
Fort Vancouver expert to shed light on recently found cannons
Navy still owns cannons found from 1846 shipwreck
Links to the co-sponsors of this event:
Fort Vancouver National Site
Northwest Cultural Resources Institute
Hosting the event:
Columbia River Maritime Museum

Cannon found on beach to go on display

The carronades found last month, which are potentially from the USS Shark went on display to the public at Nehalem Bay State Park on March 18 from 11 a.m. until Noon, and NW Limited was there!

The USS Shark, a Navy survey schooner, sank in 1846, as listed on “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” NW Limited‘s new shipwreck chart
One of the carronades,  found on the beach in 1898 was what inspired founders to name “Cannon Beach” exactly that.
Come see…all aboard for a road trip!

More information at these links:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. information page for the cannon
Oregon Coast: Cannon Artifacts Open for Public Viewing March 18

Dead Reckoning, what it is

…other than the short version title of NW Limited’s shipwreck chart.
(a click on that link will take you to a slideshow of images with accompanying radio ad for the chart)

Dead reckoning (DR) is the process of estimating one’s current position based upon a previously determined position, or fix, and advancing that position based upon known speed, elapsed time, and course.”  (from Wikipedia)
The term, which is where Bill derived the title of his most recent project,  sounds ominous enough.
Rightly so when you consider that a good percentage of shipwrecks resulted in loss of life, sometimes on a tragically large scale. 
Dead reckoning as a form of navigation is only so accurate. 

It is interpreted in some circles as “You’re dead if you don’t reckon right.” 

It’s a sure thing, however, to score one of these for yourself.  
As a gift, they will make a lasting impression.  
Not to mention you’ll get shipwreck author Don Marshall’s quote concerning Dead Reckoning, printed at the top of each chart.
Available in three variations:


Lithograph on high-quality paper (this is no mere “poster”): $50

Custom-framed as well as coated with vinyl linen for protection (no glass necessary): $225

The top of the line (shown above), the pinnacle of shipwreck history complete with photos, handmade paper accents (list of lost fishing vessels), stamps and more: $500

1000 total first printing “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” charts are available.
This is the perfect gift, acquisition, or investment in local history and culture.
A stellar complement to the “beach house” or a respectful nod to the intrepid souls who lost their lives in the maritime industry, and to those that beat the odds.

Detail of lost fishing vessels list, on handmade paper using an antique letterpress by Oblation Papers and Press of Portland, Oregon.
For more information,  call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com
NW Limited…History in VogueTM accepts credit cards, and will ship, too!

On the radio today KAST 1370

Did you catch it?
Tuned to KAST am Radio 1370  from 4 pm to 5 pm, you would have heard Bill Brooks of NW Limited as a guest on the Dezmo Zone.