Another mystery shipwreck on the south Oregon coast appears

http://www.theworldlink.com/articles/2010/01/04/news/doc4b422f6cd54a3629602102.txt

Published in: on January 3, 2010 at 4:27 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Oct. 25, 1906: Wreck of the Peter Iredale

On October 25, 1906, the bark Peter Iredale was wrecked on the Oregon coast at Clatsop Spit near

The Peter Iredale shortly after grounding in October, 1906

The Peter Iredale shortly after grounding in October, 1906

Warrenton attempting a Columbia River entrance.
The grounded ship was unsalvageable.
Over a century later, only her rusting bones remain.

Peter Iredale revealed by the storms of December. Photo taken January 2008 near Ft. Stevens

Peter Iredale in January 2008 near Ft. Stevens. The wreck is one of several hundred casualties of the Pacific Graveyard and appears as the most familiar landmark on "Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard" shipwreck chart by NW Limited...History in VogueTM.

 
Oft-photographed, endlessly visited by tourists, the Iredale’s weathered skeleton is testament both to the forces of nature and folly of man. 

There are countless more like her that have disappeared, shipwrecked forever by virtue of lucky salvage or the relentless pounding of waves, wind, tide and time.

Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” documents these, lifting them from conscious memory, and marking them in historic record.
Anecdotes from each wreck are provided, stories which are entwined in the foundation of a region rich with maritime activity.
As the newest and most complete shipwreck chart of the SW Washington, NW Oregon coast and lower Columbia River, it is also the most aesthetically-minded.
Printed on high-quality paper, the lithograph (detail shown below) is built to stand the test of time both as a collectible, historic tribute and an artful display. 
Dead Reckoning Shipwreck chart detail showing the wreck of the Iredale as well as several others at the mouth of the Columbia River click on the image for larger, readable version

"Dead Reckoning" Shipwreck chart detail showing the wreck of the Iredale as well as several others at the mouth of the Columbia River

For information on ordering a shipwreck chart directly from the creator, please contact bill@nwlimited.com or call 503-338-6056.

Lucky 13

The number 13 is attached to many superstitious beliefs.  Often thought to be an omen for misfortune, there are still others that prefer the opposite approach, believing the number to be the symbol of a charmed existence.
Here are a couple of NW Limited‘s “lucky” 13s for you to consider:
A Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard (#13!) has gone home with its fortunate owner:

Number 113 “little” Lewis & Clark States Map, home from the front lines:



Bill likes to send his work out into the world to see how they handle the stress and strain, the mishaps of existing in a messy environment, or a high-traffic one. Placement is key, and History in Vogue can often be found in the most rigorous conditions.
We’re not divulging the location where this little number did its time, but it looks damn good for its veteran status.
N(ot) F(or) S(ale).
Others like it can be had for $85, and with a minimum of care, it will never look like ol’ lucky, there.
Have you encountered NW Limited…History in VogueTM somewhere in your travels?

On the radio today KAST 1370

Did you catch it?
Tuned to KAST am Radio 1370  from 4 pm to 5 pm, you would have heard Bill Brooks of NW Limited as a guest on the Dezmo Zone.

Wreck of the Lupatia – Jan. 3, 1881

An excerpt from NW Limited’s ‘Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard’ chart reads:
“Lupatia -1/3/1881- British bark: A south-easterly gale throws Lupatia onto Tillamook reef; a dog survives -16 dead”

One can imagine her final hours. A bleak, January night with the wind and surf shattering her against the rocks mere weeks before the Tillamook Lighthouse, a/k/a “Terrible Tilly” was to be lit.
The crew working on construction of that lighthouse saw Lupatia’s running lights as she approached.  In the near-miss incident,  they could hear Lupatia’s crew shouting orders of “Hard apart!” as they scrambled to keep her off the rock which so desperately needed a light as warning. 
 The construction crew kindled fires, and used lanterns to try and assist the captain as he navigated the rock-strewn reef.   Narrowly missing the rock itself, she disappeared into the darkness.
Lupatia’s debris littered the rocks below the nearly complete lighthouse the following morning.  16 lives lost…
 Would her fate have been the same had her captain had that light to use as guide?
 Unlike the Peter Iredale, or the George L. Olson, nothing remains of the Lupatia, no structure to climb and explore, no resting place to visit.
NW Limited’s historic achievement of the most detailed and complete shipwreck chart to date, immortalizes her.
The lithograph alone is a great place to start when looking for shipwreck history, but the framed and matted version  (left) is an adventure of its own with its photographs of shipwrecks, United States Coast Guard insignia and USPS stamp, the lost fishing vessels and more, all displayed within a high-quality, hand-finished frame.

Each chart is custom-built by Bill Brooks of NW Limited in Astoria, Oregon and no two will be exactly alike.
While you can’t take home the George L. Olson,
or the bowsprit of the Peter Iredale, you can
have “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” your own magnificent gathering of maritime history in the Pacific Northwest.
bill@nwlimited.com or 503-338-8215