Astute observation 2.3

In two-thousand-and-eight, the measure of your status is not how much you make, or how much you have, it is instead how little you owe.

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Published in: on May 2, 2008 at 12:41 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Cannons from USS Shark topic of event at Columbia River Maritime Museum

At 2:30 pm Saturday, March 22, historian Greg Shine of the Fort Vancouver National Site, gave a free, public speech about the cannons, or carronades, that were recently found at the Arch Cape, Oregon beach.  David Pearson, curator for the Columbia River Maritime Museum, spoke afterward about conservation and restoration efforts.
They are believed to have come from the 1846 wreck of the USS Shark, a Navy research schooner.
Below are a few photographs (click for larger images) we took while visiting the Nehalem Bay park at the State Park-hosted viewing of the carronades (they are being kept constantly immersed in water, to prevent further damage before restoration begins):

The surface feels much like concrete encasing the carronade due to pressure and reaction of the elements surrounding the carronades for 162 years.
They were buried in approximately 20′ of sand prior to the Winter of 2007-2008 storms’ erosion.

You can see the mounting apparatus on the bottom of the cannon in this picture on the right.

The pieces in the bottom are a chain and possibly other bits of the USS Shark Navy schooner, which was wrecked on the Columbia River Bar.

The event took place at the Columbia River Maritime Museum at 792 Marine Dr. in Astoria, Oregon.
If you’re at the coast on vacation, the Columbia River Maritime Museum is a terrific place to start your adventure, and get an inside look at shipwrecks, shipwreck history, sailing and fishing historic memorabilia, and the story of this region’s maritime history in general. The gift shop has a terrific (and the newest, best and probably biggest!) shipwreck chart you can take home with you…Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
For more about the chart, visit Dead Reckoning for images, but you really have to experience it in person to get the full experience.
For that privilege, you can call Bill, email, or catch us at one of the events where we are in attendance.

Links to news articles:
Fort Vancouver expert to shed light on recently found cannons
Navy still owns cannons found from 1846 shipwreck
Links to the co-sponsors of this event:
Fort Vancouver National Site
Northwest Cultural Resources Institute
Hosting the event:
Columbia River Maritime Museum

Cannon found on beach to go on display

The carronades found last month, which are potentially from the USS Shark went on display to the public at Nehalem Bay State Park on March 18 from 11 a.m. until Noon, and NW Limited was there!

The USS Shark, a Navy survey schooner, sank in 1846, as listed on “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” NW Limited‘s new shipwreck chart
One of the carronades,  found on the beach in 1898 was what inspired founders to name “Cannon Beach” exactly that.
Come see…all aboard for a road trip!

More information at these links:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. information page for the cannon
Oregon Coast: Cannon Artifacts Open for Public Viewing March 18

161 candles

The father of the telephone was born this day in 1847. He passed away in 1922, but his telephonic contribution to our society continues to be a tremendous factor in everyday life. Not as many of us realize that Mr. Bell was also considered to be influential in aeronautics as well as a founding member of the National Geographic Society.
Use that famous, historic invention of his to make a date with destiny and experience History in VogueTM for yourself.

Wreck of the Lupatia – Jan. 3, 1881

An excerpt from NW Limited’s ‘Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard’ chart reads:
“Lupatia -1/3/1881- British bark: A south-easterly gale throws Lupatia onto Tillamook reef; a dog survives -16 dead”

One can imagine her final hours. A bleak, January night with the wind and surf shattering her against the rocks mere weeks before the Tillamook Lighthouse, a/k/a “Terrible Tilly” was to be lit.
The crew working on construction of that lighthouse saw Lupatia’s running lights as she approached.  In the near-miss incident,  they could hear Lupatia’s crew shouting orders of “Hard apart!” as they scrambled to keep her off the rock which so desperately needed a light as warning. 
 The construction crew kindled fires, and used lanterns to try and assist the captain as he navigated the rock-strewn reef.   Narrowly missing the rock itself, she disappeared into the darkness.
Lupatia’s debris littered the rocks below the nearly complete lighthouse the following morning.  16 lives lost…
 Would her fate have been the same had her captain had that light to use as guide?
 Unlike the Peter Iredale, or the George L. Olson, nothing remains of the Lupatia, no structure to climb and explore, no resting place to visit.
NW Limited’s historic achievement of the most detailed and complete shipwreck chart to date, immortalizes her.
The lithograph alone is a great place to start when looking for shipwreck history, but the framed and matted version  (left) is an adventure of its own with its photographs of shipwrecks, United States Coast Guard insignia and USPS stamp, the lost fishing vessels and more, all displayed within a high-quality, hand-finished frame.

Each chart is custom-built by Bill Brooks of NW Limited in Astoria, Oregon and no two will be exactly alike.
While you can’t take home the George L. Olson,
or the bowsprit of the Peter Iredale, you can
have “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard,” your own magnificent gathering of maritime history in the Pacific Northwest.
bill@nwlimited.com or 503-338-8215

Captivating shipwrecks…

Updating this post again since there is more information coming in:

The mystery of the Coos Bay shipwreck has been solved, even as more have been revealed. 
Rumors of treasure and the possibility of finding more historic artifacts on the beaches of Oregon and Washington continues.
A local puzzler has been the whereabouts of the Peter Iredale’s bowsprit, which parted company from the main section of the shipwreck decades ago.  It turns out that the bowsprit was right in Ft. Stevens Park all along (click link for news story).
2007’s mega-storm is apparently not finished giving in the form of historic intrigue along the Oregon (and Washington) coasts.

(Detail area showing the mouth of the Columbia River, where the USS Shark met her fate in 1846)
The “ghost ship” discovered in January near Coos Bay, Oregon has turned out to be the George L. Olson, which ran aground in 1944. She was a 223-foot long steam schooner originally launched in 1917.
The pre-Civil War era cannons (which are not really cannons, but carronades) found near Arch Cape, Oregon, over the Presidents Day weekend are believed to be part of the USS Shark’s  carronade
The USS Shark attempted to cross the Columbia River bar in 1846, and failed, grounding then sinking there.
Luckily no lives were lost, but all her cargo including a box containing $4,000 are missing. After 162 years, the cannons found this past weekend are in remarkably good shape.
Is it possible that the cash box from the USS Shark is still waiting to be found?
Two more wrecks have also risen from the sands:  
The Acme is located north of Bandon, Oregon, near Cut Creek.  She went aground on Halloween in 1924 when her captain missed the river’s entrance in foggy conditions.  416 tons of schooner was burned once most everything was salvaged, but she refuses to disappear entirely.

Photo courtesy of Dick Mason of Florence, OR from his page on Oregon Shores’ Coast Watch mile post 169
The wreck of the Bella surfaced south of where the Siuslaw River empties into the ocean at Florence, Oregon. Bella was wrecked in 1905.  She appears to be in the process of disappearing beneath the sand again. 
Dick wrote that there is another wreck visible near Florence. It’s a wooden hull, possibly the bow or stern, about 30-40′ barely visible. Here are the pictures he sent of what’s left:
The location is next to the Siuslaw River North Jetty, in the mudflat about 50 yards east of the Coast Guard observation tower.
Visible at low and minus tides, and in a deteriorated state.
Photos of the mystery shipwreck are also used by permission from the photographer, Dick Mason.
Could she be the “Wilhelmina,” or any of 13 other wrecks known to be in the area?

A fifth wreck is known to be lurking in Siletz Bay, waiting to re-surface, and researchers are eager for that occasion so they can determine the origin.
This spate of stories leaves one to wonder about what is still buried in the sands, or preserved in the chill waters off the Oregon and Washington coasts, waiting for the right time to be discovered.
The Pacific Graveyard is far from done collecting its due, but it is always providing us with volumes of intriguing stories, and clues to our history, in exchange.
What else might we discover as time passes and the wind, sand and sea roll over the remains of our hidden maritime history?
Whatever that may be, it’s clear that shipwrecks have cast a spell over all our imaginations, and captured our attentions.

Links to news stories and sources:
Shipwreck stories at World Link
Shipwreck resurfaces in Bandon
Two New Shipwrecks Have Emerged
One Shipwreck Mystery Solved, Two More Appear
Awash With Mystery
Shipwreck Mystery Intrigues Ocean Shores
Experts wonder what’s unearthing coastal treasures (Eugene Register-Guard
Shipwreck Registry
Tall Ships of San Francisco

Shipwreck Discoveries Continue to Intrigue Beachcombers…

Shipwrecks as history are in vogue, for they are in the news frequently of late. 
Public interest is obvious in the flocks of visitors to see the mystery shipwreck which recently appeared in the Coos Bay area.
  More previously-lost bits of ships are turning up. The unprecedented churning of December’s big storms may be partly to blame.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

 In December 2007, a partially-burned shipwreck piece washed ashore near Ocean Shores, Washington.  No identity has been determined for that wreck.  Could it be a vessel previously unidentified, or is it a part of a known shipwreck?

 At left,  one of many featured photos from the framed, matted version of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, depicting the Frank W. Howe, which ran aground on North Head.  Two lives were lost as well as the ship and cargo of lumber.

On Presidents Day, two cannons were discovered near Arch Cape, Oregon.
They are believed to be from the USS Shark, a war ship/survey schooner which attempted to cross the Columbia River bar in 1846, and sank there.
The ship is listed in her rightful place on Dead
Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard
which is the most detailed, most beautiful shipwreck chart created to date by Bill Brooks of NW Limited…History in VogueTM.

Bill’s contribution to local history, as well as local culture are commendable for the sheer volume of information available here. 
It must be seen to be believed!

(detail below of the mouth of the river portion of Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard, showing the USS Shark among the multitude of others)

She may have been wrecked at the mouth of the Columbia, but where the USS Shark’s cannons ended up were a secret which the elements chose now to reveal….
or is it the beginning of another saga, the story of another shipwreck altogether?

The discoveries of these wrecks and their wreckage are significant in that these events are the story of all of us, of communities, places and people.  They are a part of our past, present and future.  History. In Vogue!
This quote from the the Oregonian Oregon Blog Live site illustrates well the concept of how shipwrecks have far-reaching effects:
“After it wrecked, part of the ship’s wreckage came ashore near Hug Point. A trio of carronades was among the wreckage. At the time, a Navy sailor was sent to recover the wreckage but he was able to reclaim only one of the cannons. He moved it to higher ground, but it eventually was covered in sand and disappeared until 1898 when it washed ashore. That cannon later became the namesake of Cannon Beach. ”
Archaeologists are requesting that visitors leave the relics where they lie, and not disturb them so that they can better determine their origin. You can, however, have your very own shipwreck chart, which is even better with all the “extras” you will receive in the framed version. (click this link for a preview of this amazing piece of history)
$50 for the lithograph in a tube, and $500 for the framed, matted, intensively detailed version.  There will be 500 of each available. 
Call 503-338-6056 or email bill@nwlimited.com  to find out more.

KGW News: Hands off historic cannons near Cannon Beach, archeologists say
OPB News: Beachcombers Find Cannons on Oregon Beach
Pair of Cannons Found on Oregon Coast Could Be From 1846 Ship
Mystery Ship Revealed in Deep Sand Near Coos Bay, OR

Treasure awaits discovery on the coast

Storms eventually give back what they once took.

You don’t need to do much more than look out your window to see that we’ve had a rough winter. 
The evidence is everywhere in landslides, structure damage, trees twisted, bent and shattered.  That same weather has also had the effect of exposing shipwrecks both currently known as well as revealing mysteries.
In mid-December of 2007, a 21-ft. piece of a pre 19th-century, partially-burned shipwreck washed ashore near Ocean Shores, Washington. (click for news link) The wreck that it came from has not been identified, but it could be any number of possibilities in a region rich with stories similar.
If you’ve recently ventured
out to Ft. Stevens, you’ve
likely noticed that the Peter Iredale’s more visible than usual.
The violent action of Winter surf and wind have stripped away her shroud of sand, providing great photo opportunities and sightseeing.
         Hidden for a hundred years, another shipwreck has emerged from the dunes near Coos Bay, Oregon. (link to news story) No one seems yet to be able to indentify the wreck, but its construction dates it to the late 1800s. A schooner-turned-barge once plied the waters of Oregon, disappearing into the sands of a southern beach. Forgotten until the elements exposed her, speculation abounds. The hows, the whys and whens are questions leading the mind along limitless paths of possibility. 


Detail of Dead Reckoning showing some of the positions of shipwrecks at the mouth of the Columbia River.

Shipwreck lore makes fascinating history, rife with romantic notions of treasures lost, of life and death heroism.
In truth, the stories behind these maritime misfortunes range from utter tragedy to simple, uneventful groundings in which all hands merely stepped onto the sand entrapping their ship, and walked ashore. Destinies were changed in light of capricious currents, churlish channels and surprise storms. Each story plays out to an end, though many also carry beginnings along with them:
Place names were gained, sometimes a town was begun where shipwrecks deposited large numbers of survivors in one area.
In more than one instance, a survivor met and married their mate at the site of a wreck, and settled there to become part of the place that claimed the very ship they’d arrived on.
If you do your research, you will find a wealth of true-to-life adventure, even treasure may just be lurking beneath the sand,
or preserved within the Pacific’s depths.

 

 “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” shipwreck chart by NW Limited…History in VogueTM
(click on chart to view the readable, large lithograph only version)


From Tillamook Bay north to Pt. Grenville, the shipwrecks of the Pacific Graveyard are represented on NW Limited…History in Vogue’s “Dead Reckoning” shipwreck chart. Along the left edge, the names, dates and summaries of the wrecks read like prose, leading you into a reverie of maritime history. These are stories of the earliest civilization in this region.  The lithographs are $50.

Before Lewis & Clark arrived, there were already centuries worth of shipwrecks which had occurred and influenced the native people, therefore changing the course of history.
Collaboration with numerous sources including shipwreck author Don Marshall has ensured the best possible representation of date, location and circumstances as well as identity. Many of these are in the process of being researched even now. (see link to the Beeswax Project as example, below).
Not all “treasure” is tangible, after all.
So: chart a course for historic adventure, and intriguing discovery. Own for yourself, or give as a gift, the ultimate piece of local history, “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” by NW Limited…History in VogueTM.
Contact: Bill Brooks 503-338-6056 or email: bill@nwlimited.com
Other links of interest:
Shipwreck Registry of Oregon
Columbia River Maritime Museum
Nehalem Beeswax Wreck Project

Welcome to 2008

NW Limited…History in VogueTM has had a busy year in 2007.  We were at Sunday Market through monsoons and heat waves, and will be there again in 2008.  NW Limited could be found at the Astoria-Warrenton Crab and Seafood Festival as well as various other local and regional events.  More importantly, our History in VogueTM line has been expanded greatly this past year.

2007 saw the final phases of  “Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” shipwreck chart.  The Beatles, the Jamestown, Virgina map (a celebration of the quadricentennial), Star Wars, Yoda, and Jimmy Stewart have joined the lineup also. Whew!
The Lewis & Clark maps, all three variations, are nearing the end of their availability.  DC and Marvel comics are still available with many new events included in their respective editions. The Beatles pieces continue to be extremely popular.  American Motorcycle just keeps getting better, and the USS Ronald Reagan is also still available for purchase.
2008, however, has brought the shipwreck chart full circle, and it is now complete, and ready to be presented to the public after four years of research and development.  The  lithographs are ready to go right now.  A substantial 33″ long by 17″ wide, the chart is the largest piece to date. 
They will be shipped in a 4″ tube along with a letter signed by the creator, Bill Brooks. 
Contact Bill at bill@nwlimited.com to find out how you can score one for yourself, though they also make a stellar gift. 
“Dead Reckoning of the Pacific Graveyard” is the ultimate representation of north coast and lower Columbia River history, spanning the earliest years of maritime history on up to present day.  500 of these beautiful charts are available as lithographs. 
For the serious enthusiast, the framed, matted and custom version of Dead Reckoning will be available very soon for purchase.  When framed, they will be an impressive 44″ X 22″ of unparalleled maritime history.  (click to see detail area of the prototype)
We are taking reservations for those, now.  There will only be 500 framed to go around as well, for a total of 1000 in the first printing. 

To see our Hollywood-related pieces, you can go to Video Horizons in Astoria.  While you’re looking for a couple hours’ entertainment to rent, take home a piece of Hollywood history forever.  There are Star Wars, Yoda and Jimmy Stewart currently on display as well as the Easy Rider variation of American Motorcycle. 
Don’t forget that NW Limited pieces  include USPS first-day-issue stamps and postmarks.  A postmark is only available once in a lifetime.  We always start with high-quality or rare images, and (in some instances) vintage memorabilia.  They are completely unique in that they encompass a wide range of collectability as well as being singularly beautiful displays.
Some of these editions will have authentic, original autographs available, so if you’re looking for something special in these categories, contact Bill Brooks.
These tributes are the epitome of History in VogueTM!

Thank you for visiting.
Come back frequently to stay abreast of developments, new releases, and where you can find NW Limited…History in VogueTM to experience the WOW for yourself. 

(Underlined links are clickable so you can see examples of these pieces.  Some are still available,though in many cases they have been sold.  Inquiries are always welcome!)